What is the meaning of vomitorium?

What is the meaning of vomitorium?

The word ‘vomitorium’ does indeed come from the Latin root ‘vomere’ meaning ‘to vomit’ or ‘to spew forth’. But it does not refer to the contents of one’s stomach. A vomitorium is actually a passage or opening in a theatre (or amphitheatre), leading to or from the seating, through which the audience members would pass.

What was a vomitorium used for?

As far as pop culture is concerned, a vomitorium is a room where ancient Romans went to throw up lavish meals so they could return to the table and feast some more.

Why is it called a vomitory?

The word ‘vomitory’ is derived from ‘vomitorium’ which refers to a passage found beneath the seating through which an audience can exit at the end of an event. This originates from Roman times, when amphitheatres had vomitorium to allow the audience to leave.

Is there such a thing as a vomitorium?

The vomitorium is clearly part of this group, but no ancient source actually employs the word to describe a place for post-prandial puking. It first appears in the Saturnalia of Macrobius, written in the 5th century AD. Vomitorium/vomitoria are still used today by archaeologists as architectural terms.

How did Romans wipe?

The xylospongium or tersorium, also known as sponge on a stick, was a hygienic utensil used by ancient Romans to wipe their anus after defecating, consisting of a wooden stick (Greek: ξύλον, xylon) with a sea sponge (Greek: σπόγγος, spongos) fixed at one end. The tersorium was shared by people using public latrines.

Who named vomit?

Puke. A headline in the Saturday Citizen suggested that Shakespeare invented the word “puked.” In fact, he invented the word “puking.” The Citizen regrets the error. Much as we would all love to believe that Shakespeare invented puking, historical accuracy must prevail.

Who invented vomit word?

Shakespeare
A headline in the Saturday Citizen suggested that Shakespeare invented the word “puked.” In fact, he invented the word “puking.” The Citizen regrets the error. Much as we would all love to believe that Shakespeare invented puking, historical accuracy must prevail.

What is a VOM arena?

Home. » VOM or VOMITORIUM. Definition: A passageway, originally for spectators, used to clear the seating area in quick fashion.

How did Roman soldiers poop?

In the public latrines, one of the things Romans used to wipe themselves was a sponge on a stick, which was shared by everybody. And when they did go to the public latrines, one of the things they used to wipe themselves was a sponge on a stick, which was shared by everybody.

When did humans start wiping their bums?

The Stone Age (About 1 Million Years Ago) For thousands of years, stones were the go-to wiping objects.

Who first used word vomit?

It appears, the word came to usage in the early 15c., from Latin vomitus, past participle of vomitare. “Puking” was first recorded in Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.” It was likely an English imitation of the German word “spucken,” which means to spit.

Why does puking feel so bad?

Your stomach is lined with special sensor cells that use a chemical called serotonin to communicate with the nervous system. When the stomach sensors detect something bad, they send a signal to the nervous system, which then sends a signal to your brain.

What is a vomitorium?

A vomitorium is a passage situated below or behind a tier of seats in an amphitheatre or a stadium, through which big crowds can exit rapidly at the end of a performance.

What is vomiting in theatre?

The passageway behind/underneath the seats in an amphitheater, which allow patrons to enter and exit quickly and efficiently. So called because the people coming out of the openings looked as though they were being vomited out.

What Broadway theatre has a vomitorium?

The Circle in the Square Theatre, designed to reflect the theatres of ancient Greece and Rome, is the only Broadway theatre that has a vomitorium. The vomitorium is still used in many of their productions as an entrance and exit for the actors.

How many vomitoria are there in the Guthrie Theatre?

The Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota, has two permanent vomitoria, one at stage left and one at stage right, of its thrust stage.