What is obligatory intertextuality?

What is obligatory intertextuality?

Obligatory intertextuality is when the writer deliberately invokes a comparison or association between two (or more) texts. Without this pre- understanding or success to ‘grasp the link’, the reader’s understanding of the text is regarded as inadequate.

How does intertextuality help critical readers?

Readers can gain distance from or perspective on a text as they use intertextuality (i.e., make connections across texts) to engage in critical literacy.

What is the effect of intertextuality?

Recognising and understanding intertextuality leads to a much richer reading experience which invites new interpretations as it brings another context, idea, story into the text at hand. As new layers of meaning are introduced, there is pleasure in the sense of connection and the continuity of texts and of cultures.

Where does intertextuality usually take place?

Intertextuality can be created through the following means: duplication (a string of words occurring in two texts such as occurs in quotation) and stylistic means (repetition of a stress, sound, or rhyme pattern across two or more texts) naming and reference (as occurs in citations)

How does intertextuality help you understand certain concepts or ideas better?

Recognising and understanding intertextuality leads to a much richer reading experience which invites new interpretations as it brings another context, idea, story into the text at hand. Intertextuality also invites us to revisit the earlier text, often with new insights into its meaning for our time.

What is an intertextual analysis?

Intertextual analysis examines the relation of a statement to that sea of words, how it uses those words, how it positions itself in respect to those other words. There may be many reasons for analyzing the intertextuality of a text.

What are the advantages of intertextuality?

The advantage of an intertextual approach is that it focuses on the process of composition to reveal intention, while allowing for the reader’s role in producing the meaning of a text. It is both reader and writer centred, encompassing the entire process by which a text comes into being and is understood.