What is Normoblastic erythroid hyperplasia?

What is Normoblastic erythroid hyperplasia?

Definition. A laboratory test result indicating an abnormally high quantity of immature red blood cells containing hemoglobin and a pyknotic nucleus. [ from NCI]

What is mild erythroid hyperplasia?

A condition in which immature red blood cells (erythroid cells) in the bone marrow are abnormal in size, shape, organization, and/or number. Erythroid dysplasia may be caused by vitamin deficiency or chemotherapy, or it may be a sign of refractory anemia, which is a myelodysplastic syndrome.

What does Hypercellular mean in medical terms?

Hypercellular is a term pathologists use to describe an increased number of cells compared to normal in an area of the body. Hypercellular can be used to describe both benign (non-cancerous) groups of cells and malignant (cancerous) tumours.

What is normoblastic erythroid hyperplasia?

Normoblastic Erythroid Hyperplasia (Concept Id: C1335067) A laboratory test result indicating an abnormally high quantity of immature red blood cells containing hemoglobin and a pyknotic nucleus. Normoblastic Erythroid Hyperplasia

What is the meaning of erythroid hyperplasia?

Erythroid hyperplasia is a condition of excessive count of erythroid precursor cells (in layman words, immature red blood cells) in the bone marrow. Description. Erythroid cells are formed from myeloid progenitor cells and from megakaryocyte erythroid pregenitor cells, which are then turned into mature red blood cells.

How is erythroid hypoplasia characterized in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)?

Occasional reports have documented the occurrence of erythroid hypoplasia in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). These patients present with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia, and a paucity of recognizable erythroid cells in the bone marrow, associated with some evidence of an intrinsic cell defect.

How do you test for Erythroid Hyperplasia?

Erythroid hyperplasia. Erythroid hyperplasia may be confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. The marrow is normo- or hypercellular with increased normoblastic erythropoiesis, which is organized in clusters. Blood test results may vary depending on the underlying disorder.