Is Staffordshire pottery worth anything?

Is Staffordshire pottery worth anything?

Values vary widely ranging from $500 to several thousands of dollars for each piece depending on many different factors. Staffordshire pieces were exhibited at World’s Fairs and public exhibitions like the Panama Pacific Expo of 1915.

How do I identify my Staffordshire pottery?

A common potters mark or symbol can be found on large quantities of Staffordshire pottery & porcelain. The Staffordshire knot mark, as it is known, consists of a three loop knot constructed from a length of rope. Often with a set of initials within the knot loops and sometimes a crown above the knot.

What is Staffordshire pottery called?

Staffordshire ware, lead-glazed earthenware and unglazed or salt-glazed stoneware made in Staffordshire, England, from the 17th century onward.

How can you tell if Staffordshire figures are real?

What to look for:

  1. Press moulded body with defined modelling and a very small firing hole in the base. (
  2. Painted decoration: detailed with a face full of character and slight differences between the pair.
  3. Soft gilding showing evidence of age.
  4. Signs of crazing, or firing flaws on the base.
  5. No maker’s mark.

Is Royal Stafford the same as Royal Staffordshire?

Royal Stafford. Royal Stafford was formed in March 1992 with the combination of two famous pottery factories, Royal Stafford China and Barratts of Staffordshire, both with a history in keeping with their well known names.

How can you tell a fake Staffordshire?

Is Staffordshire pottery still made?

Royal Stafford today is an industry leader in the manufacturing of English cream-coloured earthenware, a traditional Staffordshire product. We are one of only a handful of potteries where all production still takes place in England.

Why are Staffordshire pottery dogs called Wally dogs?

The so-called Staffordshire dogs were one of the hottest décor pieces in England and Scotland in the 19th century. Well, it was said that with time the Staffordshire dogs, also called Wally dogs in Scotland, moved from the mantelpiece to the windows to show off their newfound bourgeoisie.

How much are Staffordshire dogs worth?

The dogs once again caught the attention of collectors in the 1980s and prices skyrocketed. Today, prices can be as low as $350 for a pair of late 19th century spaniel figurines. However, rarer ones, like Dalmatians, even when damaged or with known restorations, can sell for several thousand dollars.

Is pottery still made in Staffordshire?

Royal Stafford is based in the Royal Overhouse Manufactory, one of the oldest pottery factories in Burslem, the Mother Town of the Potteries in Stoke-on-Trent. We are one of only a handful of potteries where all production still takes place in England. …

Are there any potteries left in Stoke?

Wedgwood, Moorcroft, Aynsley, Burleigh, Dudson, Emma Bridgewater, Portmeirion, Spode, Royal Doulton, and Royal Stafford are just a few of the leading brands you will find in the city.

Is Staffordshire pottery always marked?

Like other low cost mass produced items, original 19th and early 20th century Staffordshire figures are very rarely marked.

How much is the Staffordshire pottery collection worth?

The Staffordshire Pottery was predicted to sell for £70,000 but high demand pushed the hammer price to £107,000. The majority of the collection dated to the mid-19th century and comprised Staffordshire Figures which are primarily of animals and famous people.

What kind of porcelain is made in Staffordshire?

Probably the most recognized Staffordshire porcelain would be Blue Ware or Flow Blue Porcelain as pictured above, (although Flow Blue is more a process than a type of porcelain). The English porcelain industry was reaching its peak in Staffordshire as porcelain makers were discovering the benefits of a cobalt coloring they were using.

What is a potter’s Mark?

A common potters mark or symbol can be found on large quantities of Staffordshire pottery & porcelain. The Staffordshire knot mark, as it is known, consists of a three loop knot constructed from a length of rope. Often with a set of initials within the knot loops and sometimes a crown above the knot.

What is Staffordshire china dinnerware made of?

Using bone-china porcelain, in 1887 they began producing a fine line of Staffordshire dinnerware under the new name of Crown Staffordshire China. Spode – Early production included creamware, pearlware and blue-printed earthenware.