Is my orchid growing a new stem or root?

Is my orchid growing a new stem or root?

Determining whether a new growth is a root or a flower spike is largely a matter of visual observation and time. Orchid flower spikes are usually greener than roots and have a flatter, mitten-shaped tip. While growing, spikes remain green along their full length.

Will my orchid grow a new spike?

Orchids will grow new stems, fortunately. You can propagate a new Phalaenopsis or Vanda orchids from stem cuttings. You can also expect a flower spike to grow back after cutting it down when its blooms die.

How do I get my orchid to grow a new spike?

To get a new orchid flower spike, place the plant in an area with a lower room temp — about 55–65°F at night should do it. Placing your orchid in a window away from the heater might work, too. We’ve had best success getting new flower spikes in winter, when our homes and their windows aren’t as warm.

What do you do with a new orchid spike?

You should not cut a flower spike immediately after an orchid has finished blooming. Instead, wait until the top section of the flower spike turns brown, then cut it just above the 3rd or 4th node. By doing this, the flower spike may produce a lateral spike from one of the nodes, leading to another crop of blooms.

Why is my orchid not growing stems?

Your easiest solution is to move your orchid to a spot where it gets a few hours of direct morning or late-afternoon sun. This will ensure that the plant gets enough energy to make a spike with lots of flower buds. Introduce this stronger light gradually, however—over a week or so.

Why won’t my orchid grow a new spike?

A brown or yellow spike will not produce any new buds. Weak, short or thin spikes are signs of inadequate light, too much light or a mineral deficiency. If you suspect a virus, isolate your plant to keep the sickness from spreading. For short spikes, less light is key, so move the orchid away from the window.

Should I cut the orchid spike?

After the flowers drop from the orchid you have three choices: leave the flower spike (or stem) intact, cut it back to a node, or remove it entirely. Removing the stem will direct the +plant’s energy toward root development, which makes for a healthier plant and increased chances for new bloom spikes.

Why is my orchid growing so many new roots?

These new roots mean that the orchid is at the beginning of active growth and will help a newly potted orchid the best chance at establishing itself in a new pot. When potting, use care as these new roots are fragile.

Should I cut the flower spike off my orchid?

Remove the flower spike entirely by clipping it off at the base of the plant. Withered stems won’t produce flowers. Removing the stem will direct the +plant’s energy toward root development, which makes for a healthier plant and increased chances for new bloom spikes.

Is it a root or a spike on my orchid?

Something is poking out of the base of your orchid plant. Is it a new root, or—even more exciting—a flower spike? It can be hard to tell the difference, especially for orchid beginners. In a Phalaenopsis orchid, both roots and spikes are usually green when they begin to emerge, which makes it that much harder to distinguish the two.

Why does my orchid have roots all around the pot?

This orchid has a bunch of ariel roots, they are growing all around this pot. In this case the orchid needs to be repotted soon to push some of these roots down in the soil. Each spike on an orchid will have at least a few nodes going up the spike prior to the blooms.

What is the difference between a Phalaenopsis root and Spike?

When a new root or flower spike starts to grow at the base of the Phalaenopsis, look carefully. There is a distinct difference between the two. Take a look at the picture below. The short reddish growth on the left of the base of the plant is a root, and the growth on the right is a flower spike.

How can I tell the difference between roots and spikes?

It can be hard to tell the difference, especially for orchid beginners. In a Phalaenopsis orchid, both roots and spikes are usually green when they begin to emerge, which makes it that much harder to distinguish the two. I’ve found that with orchids, the easiest way to learn is with our eyes. So, I write bearing visual aids.