Is Hep B considered an infectious disease?

Is Hep B considered an infectious disease?

What is Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The natural course of hepatitis B disease is different from one person to another. The first phase of disease, during the first 6 months after a person becomes infected, is called acute hepatitis B infection.

Is hepatitis B infectious or noninfectious?

Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis B can be “acute” or “chronic.” Acute hepatitis ranges in severity from a mild to severe illness that occurs within the first 6 months of exposure to the Hepatitis B virus.

Why is hepatitis B infectious?

Hepatitis B is spread when blood, semen, or other body fluids from a person infected with the virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment; or from mother to baby at birth.

Can you transmit hepatitis B?

No. Hepatitis B is a sexually transmitted disease, but it is spread in other ways, too. This is a hardy virus that can exist on almost any surface for up to one month. You can get infected through contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.

How long is hepatitis B contagious?

Symptoms of hepatitis B may not appear for 3 months after exposure and can last for 2–12 weeks. However, you are still contagious, even without symptoms . The virus can live outside the body for up to seven days.

Does Hepatitis A contagious?

Hepatitis A can be spread from close, personal contact with an infected person, such as through certain types of sexual contact (like oral-anal sex), caring for someone who is ill, or using drugs with others. Hepatitis A is very contagious, and people can even spread the virus before they feel sick.

Which hepatitis is contagious?

What is the fastest way to cure hepatitis B?

Several antiviral medications — including entecavir (Baraclude), tenofovir (Viread), lamivudine (Epivir), adefovir (Hepsera) and telbivudine (Tyzeka) — can help fight the virus and slow its ability to damage your liver. These drugs are taken by mouth. Talk to your doctor about which medication might be right for you.